Celtic Cuisine

Celtic culture consists not only of legends, St. Patrick’s Day, and step dancing. A major part of cultural heritage of Ireland is made up of traditional cuisine. The Irish people live in the harsh natural conditions or windy and rainy weather, as a result, traditional Irish dishes are hearty, greasy, and very tasty. We suggest you try some traditional recipes.

Celtic Cuisine
Celtic Cuisine

Irish Mashed Potatoes and Cabbage Porridge Colcannon

The traditional Irish title for this dish is cál ceannann which means ‘white cabbage’. So, you will need: potatoes 600 g; cabbage 600 g; bacon 100 g; 100 ml of milk or heavy cream; 1 onion; butter 30 g; 0.5 teaspoon of salt; a pinch of black pepper; green onions for serving.

Finely chop the bacon, fry in a pan, took the pieces out of a pan and place them somewhere warm. Add the finely chopped onion to the remaining fat and fry lightly. Then add the finely chopped cabbage, stir and fry on low heat for about 25 minutes. Stir occasionally. Boil the peeled potatoes, simmer them, add milk or cream, add butter and mash everything but not too finely, small pieces may remain in the porridge. Put the mashed potatoes in a pan with cabbage, salt, add pepper and mix. Place the cabbage in a large plate, sprinkle with bacon pieces and chopped onion leaves. Eat hot. You may also like a pint of Guinness beer with this dish to make it more authentic.

Irish Beef

This Irish dish is even tastier if it is prepared the day before and served with mashed potatoes. You will need many products to make this dish: butter 100 g; 1 chopped onion; 3 garlic cloves finely chopped; flour 2 tbsp.; 1 carrot; 1 kg of beef that would be suitable for stewing; grounded nutmeg 0.25 teaspoons; 1 finely chopped celery stalk; 600 ml Guinness beer; peel and juice of 2 oranges; 1 handful of fresh chopped parsley for garnish; salt and black pepper.

Irish Beef
Irish Beef

Preheat the oven to 120 degrees. Melt half of the butter in a stew bowl on the stove and fry with the onions and garlic until soft. Meanwhile, roll the meat with flour. Melt the remaining butter in a pan and fry the meat in it until browned. Put in a stew bowl with onions with garlic. Add carrots, celery, nutmeg, allspice, salt, and black pepper to taste and pour Guinness beer. Cover the casserole tightly (a cast iron casserole pot is best) and place in the oven. Simmer for about 4-6 hours, depending on the meat, until it is completely tender. Pour in the orange juice and grated peel and leave to cool overnight.

Preheat oven up to 150 degrees and be sure you prepare it for about 45 minutes before serving. This is what the Irish grandmothers would recommend you. You can taste this dish both freshly made and heated the next day and both ways are delicious. Serve it with mashed potatoes sprinkled with parsley. This is an especially good dish for a cold winter evening and long dinner.